We don’t all see the world in the same way

By Mark Dawes (June 2020)

It has taken me a while to realise that Zoom and Teams look different on a PC, on an iPad and on a Mac.  For example, the Zoom toolbar might be in the middle of the bottom of the screen (PC), or in the top right-hand corner (iPad).

Continue reading →

Posted by Admin

Substitution bingo – developing mathematical thinking in a task

by Livia Mitson (May 2020)

I was working with a year 7 class on developing meaning around algebra.  We were scheduled to look at like terms, substitution and writing expressions.  I wasn’t happy with the traditional way that I had taught it in the past as it seemed to lack opportunities for mathematical thinking.  So I bought some ATM books about algebra activities to try to expand my repertoire.

Continue reading →

Posted by Admin

Maths THUNKS

by Livia Mitson (May 2020)

One of the best websites for problem solving resources and rich tasks is median, which has resources written and collated by Don Steward, who died recently.

As my year 7 class have been experiencing a lot of mymaths and mathswatch recently, I thought we could try out having a go at a Don Steward problem, and we chose this one:

https://donsteward.blogspot.com/2009/04/chchchchanges.html

Continue reading →

Posted by Admin

Exploring Rosenshine as a Mastery Specialist

By Vicky Osborne (May 2020)

This year I have taken on a new role as a Teaching and Learning Lead. My main interest is Teaching for Mastery in secondary mathematics, and I have been very fortunate now to introduce a mastery approach into 4 different schools. In taking on the role I wanted to give serious consideration to staff wellbeing and workload. I think an enthusiasm for new teaching initiatives can cause an increase in workload for us teachers as we change our lessons and structures in order to meet new expectations.

Continue reading →

Posted by Admin

Problem solving in the time of Corona

by Ruth Colenso (May 2020)

I was fortunate (and I think brave) enough to attend the London maths event on problem solving. It was run on Zoom with the added twist that you could choose to have a blind date. I was paired with a lovely Scottish chap and we choose to use facetime to talk, and the collaborative whiteboard website bitpaper to share our work.

Continue reading →

Posted by Admin

The case for enrichment

by Livia Mitson (May 2020)

Trying to teach maths in the lockdown seems to be mostly about using external websites such as mymaths, mathswatch, hegarty maths and others.  On the whole, students seem to like them – they used them before closure for homework and for revision, and it’s a cherished strand of continuity in a time of upheaval.

These websites offer a soothing reminder of the life before lockdown; you are doing your maths homework (even though it is now classwork) in exactly the way that you did before life changed so much.

Continue reading →

Posted by Admin

Everything you ever wanted to know about negative numbers and weren’t afraid to ask!

by Jon Dunning (May 2020)

Jon set an imaginative task during school closure to his Year 7 class: “Ask me two questions about what we’ve studied in this topic. If you feel confident you know everything, think of two imaginative questions you could ask a mathematician about negative numbers.”

Below some brilliantly imaginative questions, and Jon’s answers to his class.  Will this work with any other topic? 

Continue reading →

Posted by Admin

Turning a classroom lesson into a home lesson

by Mark Dawes (April 2020)

What does the ‘FACT’ key on a calculator do?

I am going to share here a lesson I teach in the classroom and will then show how I have adapted it to be carried out by pupils by themselves at home during lockdown.

This works with the new Classwiz calculators (of any type) and the older versions of the fx-83, fx-85, etc.

I put the calculator under a visualiser and point out the ‘FACT’ command.

Continue reading →

Posted by Admin
Load more